Critical Thinking2019-03-05T21:24:25+00:00

CRITICAL THINKING

Studies show the average individual makes hundreds of decisions every day. Some of those decisions are superficial, and some of them are life-changing.

REFINING DECISION-MAKING CAPABILITIES

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Average number of critical decisions made every day.

A validated academic study conducted by researchers at Columbia and Stanford Universities analyzed decision-making outcomes and found some of us make as many as seventy decisions per day that are consequential in our professions. Wouldn’t it make sense to improve and refine our ability to make these critical decisions?

INVESTING IN FUTURE SUCCESS

Very few individuals seeking to take their organization or practice to the next level would challenge the premise that strong decision-making is a vital component of their future success. Despite this realization, many people freely admit that they have spent little time refining and building a better personal decision-making capability.

ELIMINATING BLIND SPOTS AND FALSE ASSUMPTIONS

An essential part of our work with decision-makers is challenging individuals to integrate stronger critical thinking mechanisms into their day-to-day decision-making process. Inherently, we all believe that we always make decisions with the best information and the most careful consideration that can be realized at the time. Unfortunately, many of us can fall prey to unseen cognitive biases, heuristics, groupthink and false assumptions. A coach can help us focus and develop techniques to identify our blind spots.

Eric Downing Critical Thinking

CRITICAL THINKING AND DECISION-MAKING MODEL

A leader’s decisions always interact with other actions and potential choices. Studies show that without a strong, principled, decision-making methodology in place, the more choices an individual has available to them, the higher the probability of a poor decision. A seasoned coach with a strong background in critical thinking skills, knowledge of decision-making theory, and experience can make the difference between strongly improved decision-making and the disappointment of mediocrity.